Please read below

I’m studying for my English class and need an explanation.

like i told you I will ask for your help sir. last time you did fantastic job

ENG 112

Final Presentation & Webinar on Spriggs’ On Buying Local – 473.

Due at 9 a.m. on June 13, 2020 on Canvas.

This webinar will be done in two parts both due on the same day, June 15 2020. Your webinar will include a short summary of Spriggs’ On Buying Local and your response to the following two questions as listed below. The second portion will be written (see guidelines).

GUIDELINES

1. This should be your original work only.

2. This is an individual assignment only. You will be allocated 3- 6 minutes for presentation on the abovementioned reading- This is an individual project only. Group submissions/presentation will not earn any credit.

3. Only Standard English language will be used during the presentation and during discussion in writing and during the Webinar.

4. Using inappropriate language or inappropriate actions will lead to a failing grade.

5. Reading directly from the book and/or notes/slides will lead to disqualification on this project. No more than 15 words on each slide.

6. Each student will submit a written submission accompanying the webinar on June 15, 2020. The webinar should follow the same content as the written submission with you filling in the details to your webinar audience.

7. The written submission must include the following:

Follow MLA format –12point font- Times New Roman.

1-2 pages double spaced(excluding works cited).

One paragraph summary of Spriggs’ On Buying Local – 473.

Section two of the written submission should include an analysis of Spriggs’ On Buying Local and a response to the following questions:

a. What is organic food.

b. Does organic food consumption lead us to a healthy life, which makes it worthwhile to spend more money for its purchase?

*Both these questions should not be answered by taking any information from the course text.

Please separate the summary from the second section by including sub-titles for each section. Please see attached document format guidelines & webinar guidelines.

Your presentation must be scholarly in content. Make sure to establish your credibility
as a scholar by including only scholarly sources.

FAILURE TO FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS WILL LEAD TO A LOWER
FAILING GRADE.

Please Read below

I don’t understand this Management question and need help to study.

Response #1 250 words 1 cited reference

Explain why Oatman states, “It’s not about the gun,” in relation to the profession of protective services.

Protective services professionals face a myriad of challenging duties requiring a great number of specialized skills, i.e. self-defense tactics, counter-ambush driving, first aid and CPR, advance work, evaluation of threats, risks, and vulnerabilities and firearms training, many of which become instinctive through many years of training and practical experience. Aside from the more tangible skills required of the EP professional, they also must possess particular character traits given the nature of this kind of work.

West and Jantzen (2016) argue that the following character traits to be of particular importance to the EP professional due to the “special demands of the protective service industry”: Resourcefulness, resilience, commitment, discretion, service-minded, self-aware, self-regulating, socially skilled, empathetic, and self-motivated. This seems to demonstrate that while physical attributes and technical skills are certainly required to effectively perform the job, there is more emphasis placed on the emotional intelligence and character of the EP professional.

Oatman (2006, p. 102) seems to agree with this sentiment when he categorically states, “EP is not about the gun”. If we think about the core mission of an EP professional, it would be easy to assume the “gun” would play an integral part in protection missions. Adversaries, enemies, criminals, whatever you’d like to call them, most certainly have a weapon of some sort. As Oatman (2006) pointed out, firearms are common in the United States, readily available both legally and illegally, so it would be safe to assume an adversary would indeed have access to and use a firearm, or another weapon, in their assault against a principal.

Oatman emphasized that he is not anti-firearm, but believes protective services personnel should exercise sound judgment with respect to its use. In a threat event, the main goal of the protective service agent is to protect their principal from harm and meeting a firearm with a firearm is rarely a recipe for success. Protective services professionals should really focus on the identification of risks, threats, and particular vulnerabilities and enact measures to mitigate them in ways that make armed conflict remote, or at least much less likely.

Oatman (2006, p. 103) acknowledged that attacks may happen. He provides a systematic sequence he called “arm’s reach, sound off, cover, and evacuate” in the event protective service professionals find themselves in a situation in which an adversary brandishes a firearm. This sequence is carried out by protective services by immobilizing the assailant if they are within arm’s reach, calling out that a weapon is identified and its general location, and covering and evacuating the principal as quickly as possible.

Oatman also identified some serious issues relating to the use of firearms by protective services professionals. For one, Oatman, demonstrated through his own private protective services training company that 80% of students who engaged in a firefight with an adversary lose. Based on those results, Oatman (2006, p.103) argues “It almost always pays to move the principal out of the situation as quickly as possible instead of standing one’s ground and shooting at the adversary.” A 20% success rate certainly demonstrates “It’s not about the gun.”

Oatman (2006) also suggests the legal issues relating to possessing firearms as a civilian protective services agent may cause complexities and unintended consequences for those carrying firearms. Laws concerning the carry of concealed weapons are not uniform across states and there is no federal law allowing for the carry of concealed weapons other than for qualified active and retired local, state, and federal law enforcement officers.

My overall takeaway from Chapter 6: It’s Not About the Gun is that protective services professionals should take every precaution to avoid armed confrontations with adversaries, and in the event they find themselves and their principal in that scenario, they should make every attempt to evacuate the principal as quickly as possible without engaging in kind, unless there is no other recourse.

Reference:

Oatman, Robert L., (2006). Executive protection: New solutions for a new era. Arnold, MD: Nobel HouseHouseH

West, C. and Jantzen, B. (2016, March 22). What to Look for in Corporate Executive Protection Agents. Retrieved from https://assolution.com/blog/10-personality-traits-… on October 28, 2019.

Response #2 250 words 1 cited reference

This weeks forum is Explain why Oatman states, “It’s not about the gun,” in relation to the profession of protective services. It is amazing how just a few words, a single sentence says so much, just as a picture paints a thousand words. In all honesty it doesn?t take 500 words to answer this question because Oatman gives the answer at the beginning of the chapter. In his answer equipment doesn?t save the principals life but the training, perseverance and brain power of the executive protection specialist (EPS). Now even though this is the answer we need to break this down.

Oatman, R.L., (2006), Executive Protection: New Solutions for a New Era (Rev. Ed). Arnold, Md: Noble House.

The gun should be viewed as a tool by the executive protection agent. The executive protection agent has many tools at his disposal and the gun is only one of those and should be the tool that is called on as a last resort. According to Oatman in most situation the executive protection agent will never have a chance to draw or use their weapon when an event occurs. He mentions that the EPS normally does not walk around during their course of duties for the principal at the ?gun ready?. The bad guy on the other hand, if they plan on a gun attack is already at the ?gun ready? position and so therefore already has the draw on the EPS. Once this situation occurs the EPS should be more concerned about evacuating the principal from the situation.

The above leads to one of the limitations of a gun. Not having the ability to walk around ?gun ready? presents problems. For the EPS the 1st choice in protection of the principal is to avoid trouble if possible. The 2nd choice is to flee from the trouble. And the 3rd and last choice is to fight. Fighting should only be engaged if there is absolutely no other choice.

If an attack does occur, it is important that the EPS conducts a set of steps quickly. These steps are as follows:
– Arms Reach
– Sound off
– Cover
– Evacuation

For arms reach if the attacker is within arms reach there EPS should move to immobilize the attacker. Sound off is the EPS shouting ?GUN? and should include some more detail such as ?GUN RIGHT?. For cover the EPS should cover the principals body with his own. For evac the EPS should evac the principal form the danger as soon as possible. It is mention in the book and I will mention it here because I feel it to be important and that is that these steps may not be what is done is locations like the Middle East where the EPS very well may be at ?gun ready?.

One big problem with guns is permitting the weapon. The laws for permits and what is required changes from state to state and even from one location in a state to another location in the same state. Also where you can and cannot carry your weapon. There are many facilities that do not allow the carry of firearms even if you are licensed to carry a weapon. So if the principal needs to go to these places what do you do now with the weapon. I am not a fan and never leave my weapon in a vehicle even if the weapon is locked up and the vehicle is locked.

Training is very critical and should apply to more than just your firearm. The book mention three skills that are critical for the EPS when it comes to firearms and that has to do 1) with bolstering the weapon, 2) loading the weapon, and 3) performing malfunction drills. Yes these are critical but other drills in my opinion are just as critical. I understand he can?t mention them all, just saying an EPS should be trained is multitudes of drills. Training outside the weapon should also include some form of martial arts, medical training and driving training. I know this chapter was about ?the gun? but it is also about why it?s not just about the gun and so I include other training here that is important in protecting the principal that is beyond the gun.

Oatman, R.L., (2006), Executive Protection: New Solutions for a New Era (Rev. Ed.). Arnold, Md: Noble House

Please read below

I’m studying for my English class and need an explanation.

like i told you I will ask for your help sir. last time you did fantastic job

ENG 112

Final Presentation & Webinar on Spriggs’ On Buying Local – 473.

Due at 9 a.m. on June 13, 2020 on Canvas.

This webinar will be done in two parts both due on the same day, June 15 2020. Your webinar will include a short summary of Spriggs’ On Buying Local and your response to the following two questions as listed below. The second portion will be written (see guidelines).

GUIDELINES

1. This should be your original work only.

2. This is an individual assignment only. You will be allocated 3- 6 minutes for presentation on the abovementioned reading- This is an individual project only. Group submissions/presentation will not earn any credit.

3. Only Standard English language will be used during the presentation and during discussion in writing and during the Webinar.

4. Using inappropriate language or inappropriate actions will lead to a failing grade.

5. Reading directly from the book and/or notes/slides will lead to disqualification on this project. No more than 15 words on each slide.

6. Each student will submit a written submission accompanying the webinar on June 15, 2020. The webinar should follow the same content as the written submission with you filling in the details to your webinar audience.

7. The written submission must include the following:

Follow MLA format –12point font- Times New Roman.

1-2 pages double spaced(excluding works cited).

One paragraph summary of Spriggs’ On Buying Local – 473.

Section two of the written submission should include an analysis of Spriggs’ On Buying Local and a response to the following questions:

a. What is organic food.

b. Does organic food consumption lead us to a healthy life, which makes it worthwhile to spend more money for its purchase?

*Both these questions should not be answered by taking any information from the course text.

Please separate the summary from the second section by including sub-titles for each section. Please see attached document format guidelines & webinar guidelines.

Your presentation must be scholarly in content. Make sure to establish your credibility
as a scholar by including only scholarly sources.

FAILURE TO FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS WILL LEAD TO A LOWER
FAILING GRADE.